THE NFL ON CBS 2018 / SUPER BOWL LIII

Super Bowls on CBS Technical History (1967-2019)

 

1967 Super Bowl I

 

Many production techniques developed by CBS Television Sports will be used in the broadcast of the NFL-AFL championship game. Two isolated cameras will be employed to prove video-tape reshowing of important and exciting plays and to follow individual maneuvers by members of both the offense and defense. The isolated camera was first used on football broadcasts by the CBS Television Network in the 1962 season, creating a brand new technique of coverage which has been widely adopted.

 

The Los Angeles Coliseum, where the first inter-league championship game will be played, is familiar territory for CBS Television Network technical personnel. The Network has covered the home games of the Los Angeles Rams of the NFL at the Coliseum since 1956.

 

The commentators for the championship game broadcast will be announced later.

Ray Scott and Jack Whitaker will provide play-by-play commentary for the broadcast, with Frank Gifford as an analyst. Pat Summerall hosts the pre and post –game programs.

Bill Creasy will produce the television broadcast of the game; Bob Dailey will direct.

 

 

1972 Super Bowl VI

 

Some $4,000,000 worth of television equipment will be on hand in New Orleans for the pickup, manned by a technical crew of 65 and production staff of 35. In addition, some 55 people will be working in 15 commercial control studios around the country.

 

The equipment includes 15 cameras (one of them in the Goodyear blimp) plus four stop-action, slow motion discs, two video-tape units, 40 microphones, nearly six miles of cable and 84 television monitors. Eight vehicles will transport this gear to New Orleans, where the crew will begin to set it up a week before the game.

 

 

1976 Super Bowl X

 

An expanded 90-minute special version of the broadcasts with which it introduced coverage of 86 regular season games, plus the NFC playoff and championship contests, opens Super Bowl Sunday on the CBS Television Network.

 

Eighteen (18) cameras, including one in the Goodyear blimp, four videotape machines, four slo-motion, stop action discs, and two vidifonts. In addition, 60 microphones and 110 monitors will be employed for the pre-game, and the post-game activities, along with three miles ofvideo cable and four miles of audio cable at the Orange Bowl. Ten vehicles will be used for engineering and production.

 

 

1978 Super Bowl XII

 

CBS Sports will introduce a startling video special effect during coverage of Super Bowl XII, on SUNDAY, JAN.15 (6:00 PM, ET, to conclusion) on the CBS Television Network. The device, which has been dubbed the “Action Track”* system, is an experimental prototype developed by the CBS Television Network and the CBS Technology Center, in Stamford, Conn.

 

Sporting events will take on an added dimension with the Action Track system, which provides a unique, multiple-image display of the paths of moving objects. A golf putt, for example, will appear as a string of golf balls from club head to hole. A baseball pitch will appear as an arcing row of baseballs from pitcher to hitter, enabling viewers to see the exact path taken by the ball.

 

In football, an aerial view of the field as seen with Action Track, will display the paths taken by the players during the course of a play, much like a coach’s blackboard diagram.

Robert J. Wussler, President of CBS Sports, comments: “For 10 years, the television sports industry relied heavily on the slow-motion replay. Now, along comes Action Track, a television replay device that will allow the viewer to track the precise movement of the player or the ball used in the game”

 

Joseph A. Flaherty, Vice President, engineering and Development, CBS Television Network, says: “The Actin Track system may become the style and form of an athlete’s performance. It enables the viewer to scrutinize the rapid, intricate motion that is so common in sporting events.”

Action Track holds great promise for coverage of ski jumping, diving, gymnastics, golf, and baseball, among other sports.

 

(*Action Track is a trademark of CBS Inc.)

 

 

 

1980 Super Bowl XIV

 

December 28, 1979

 

Producer Mike Pearl and director Bob Fishman will make full use of two production vans, 18 cameras and almost a like number of announcers, in presenting this special 90-minute broadcast prior to the kickoff of the National Football League’s Super Bowl XIV, to be played at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif.

 

January 8, 1980

 

CBS Sports will utilize 31 cameras in the game, pre-game, half-time and post-game broadcasts. In addition, three videotape machines (with slo-motion capabilities), three slo- motion, stop-action discs, and three character generators for the supering the score and other pertinent information will be incorporated into the broadcast of Super Bowl XIV.

 

 

1982 Super Bowl XVI

 

January 11, 1982

 

Producer Ted Shaker and director Richard Drake will have no less than 20 cameras available to capture all the pomp and circumstance leading up to America’s number-one sporting event. And, they will also have all the best technical resources at their disposal, including computer editing systems and digital video special effects.

 

23 Cameras and State-of-the-Art Electronic Equipment Will Enhance CBS Sports’ Ninth Super Bowl Broadcast

 

Executive Producer Terry O’neil will produce CBS Sport’s coverage of the game and Sandy Grossman, winner of an Emmy Award for his work on Super Bowl XIV, will once again direct. Their seasoned staff of production and technical personnel will employ 23 cameras and tons of state-of-the-art electronic broadcasting equipment –some of which will be used for the first time in a Super Bowl – to give an estimated 100 million American viewers “the best seat in the house.”

 

The CBS “Chalkboard,” a new feature making its debut during coverage of NFL playoff games, employs a device called a Telestrator, whereby hand-drawn diagrams and notes may be inscribed over a camera’s picture. John Madden will use the CBS “Chalkboard” to diagram plays incorporating the view from the high 50-yard line camera, which takes in all 22 players.

 

Other special equipment that will be used to enhance the game coverage includes four Chyron graphics generators for the presentation of printed statistical information on camera, such as score, yardage, team and player information; 14 videotape machines with “slo-mo” capability, fed from various cameras for highlights and replays as well as a CMX editing system for pre-game features; two still-storage units which hold digital still photographs of players and coaches for instant recall on the screen, and three digital video effects generators, to provide special visual effects.

 

All this equipment will be transported to and housed in Pontiac by 25 vehicles, including control trucks, mobile units and office trailers. Twenty miles of cable,100 television monitors and 100 microphones will be in use throughout the stadium.

 

 

1984 Super Bowl XVIII

 

December 22, 1983

 

The “CBS Chalkboard,” the device Madden uses to diagram plays, heads a list of state-of-the-art electronic equipment to be used in broadcasting Super Bowl XVIII. Twenty cameras will focus on the game itself, feeing 14 videotape machines with slo-mo capability for replays and highlights. A special CMX editing system will be in use for pregame features. Three Chyron graphics generators will be used for the presentation of printed statistical information on screen such as score, statistics and player identification, along with two ADDA still-storage devices whereby photos of players and coaches are available for instant recall on the screen. Two digital video effects generators will provide special visual effects.

 

The equipment will be transported to Tampa and housed in 22 vehicles, including control trucks, units to house the videotape machines and other equipment, office trailers and maintenance vehicles. Twenty miles of cable, 100 microphones and 100 television monitors will be in use throughout the stadium.

 

 

1987 Super Bowl XXI

 

January 13, 1987

 

The CBS Chalkboard,” the device Madden uses to diagram plays on the air, heads a list of state-of-the-art electronic equipment to be used in broadcasting Super Bowl XXI. Fourteen cameras will focus on the game itself, feeding 10 videotape machines with slo-mo capability for replays and highlights. A Chyron and a Dubner graphics generator will be used for the presentation of printed statistical information on screen such as scores, statistics and player identification, along with Abekas still-storage device where photos of players and coaches are available for instant recall on the screen.

 

 

1990 Super Bowl XXIV

 

January 17, 1990

 

The CBS Chalkboard,” the device Madden uses to diagram plays on the air, heads a list of state-of-the-art electronic equipment to be used in broadcasting Super Bowl XXIV. Fifteen cameras will focus on the game itself, feeding 10 videotape machines with slo-mo and super slo-mo capability for replays and highlights. A Chryron and a Dubner graphics generator will be used for the presentation of statistical information on screen, along with an Abekas still-storage device, by which photos of players and coaches are available for instant recall on the screen.

 

 

1992 Super Bowl XXVI

 

Announce Team: Pat Summerall – Play- by-play; John Madden – Analyst

Production Team: Bob Stenner – Producer; Sandy Grossman – Director

Executive Producer, CBS Sports: Ted Shaker

 

Cameras:

Fifteen cameras will be used to cover the game and events around the stadium and one additional camera in an indoor blimp and one outside in a helicopter.

 

Special Equipment:

12 videotape machines including two Super Slo-Mo’s

two Chyron graphics generators for the on-screen presentation of printed statistical material

one “chalkboard” telestrator for diagramming plays on-screen over tape replays; one “coach’s clicker”

one Abekas still-storage unit for on-screen player photos

 

Audience:

Super Bowl XXV (January 1991) was seen by 112 million total viewers in the United States.

This year’s CBS Sports broadcast of Super Bowl XXVI will be seen live throughout the United States as well as live and on videotape in more than 50 countries, foreign locations, U.S. military installations and venues.

 

 

2001 Super Bowl XXXV

 

 

 

 

2004 SB XXXVIII

 

2007 Super Bowl XLI

 

 

2010 Super Bowl XLIV

 

 

January 31, 2010

 

HIGH-SPEED CAMERAS AND HIGH-TECH GRAPHICS HIGHLIGHT CBS SPORTS’ TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES FOR SUPER BOWL XLIV COVERAGE

 

When CBS Sports presents Super Bowl XLIV on Sunday, Feb. 7 (6:00 PM, ET) from Sun Life Stadium in Miami, Fla. live on the CBS Television Network, highlighted among the technological advances that will be incorporated during its coverage are high-speed cameras and informative high-tech graphics displays. Super Bowl Sunday also features the CBS Television Network’s biggest one day of programming in high definition television format.

 

HIGH-SPEED CAMERAS

 

THE SUPER BOWL ON CBS will feature six high-speed cameras, known as SuperVision, that will be in hard and hand-held configurations located on the field, in the stands and on sideline carts. Each camera will have the ability to shoot 300-500 frames per second (normal cameras shoot 60 fps) in 1080i high definition format. These Vision Research Phantom V-640 cameras are supplied by Inertia Unlimited and are particularly used in determining questionable calls on the field (ie. fumbles, receptions, out-of-bounds, etc.) from all different angles.

 

HIGH-TECH GRAPHICS

 

In addition to the regular first down line, available on CBS Sports’ primary cameras throughout the 2009 NFL season, five other cameras will be calibrated with the first down line by SportsVision including Skycam and endzone cameras. As was done during the regular-season, EyeVision will be utilized as a multi-dimensional tool for Phil Simms’ analysis. Given the situation of a field goal or an extra-point conversion that passes above the goal posts, virtual extensions of the goal posts can be added to determine the flight path of the ball and whether the kick was good or not. Hyper Zoom, provided by ORAD, will allow CBS Sports’ coverage to zoom into any video utilizing high resolution. And, the launch of a new animation package for new elements for transitions, roll outs and open animation will be integrated to upgrade existing graphic elements.

 

SAP (Secondary Audio Programming)

 

CBS Sports will broadcast the Super Bowl in SAP. Armando Quintero and Benny Ricardo will call the action for the Network’s SAP broadcast of Super Bowl XLIV.

 

HIGH DEFINITION TELEVISION

 

CBS Sports’ coverage of Super Bowl XLIV will be the Network’s biggest one day of programming in high definition television format as SUPER BOWL XLIV (6:28 PM, ET, kickoff), the pre-game show, THE SUPER BOWL TODAY (2:00 PM, ET), and the halftime show, as well as all it’s ancillary pre-game programming including THE ROAD TO THE SUPER BOWL (12:00 Noon, ET) and PHIL SIMMS ALL-IRON TEAM: SUPER BOWL EDITION (1:00 PM, ET), will be broadcast in HDTV. CBS Sports' Super Bowl XLIV HDTV broadcasts will feature the highest definition television format – 1080i lines of picture resolution – and 5.1 digital surround sound.

 

Jim Nantz and Phil Simms will call the play-by-play of SUPER BOWL XLIV, along with Steve Tasker and Solomon Wilcots reporting. Lance Barrow will produce and Mike Arnold will direct.

 

Sean McManus is President, CBS News and Sports and serves as executive producer for the Network’s coverage of the NFL and Super Bowl XLIV. Harold Bryant is Vice President, Production, CBS Sports. Ken Aagaard is Executive Vice President, Engineering, Operations & Production Services, CBS Sports.

 

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CBS Sports Contacts: LeslieAnne Wade 212/975-5171 lwade@cbs.com

Robin Brendle 212/975-1533 rlbrendle@cbs.com

Jerry Caraccioli 212/975-7466 gwcaraccioli@cbs.com

Jen Sabatelle 212/975-4120 jsabatelle@cbs.com

 

At Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center: 954/468-4506

 

 

2013 Super Bowl XLVI

 

2016 Super Bowl 50

January 12, 2016

 

CBS SPORTS’ TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES FOR SUPER BOWL 50 HIGHLIGHTED BY “EYEVISION 360” AND PYLON CAMERAS

 

CBS SPORTS LAUNCHES BROADCAST DEBUT OF NEW LOGO AND GRAPHICS DESIGN

 

When CBS Sports presents Super Bowl 50 on Sunday, Feb. 7 (6:00 PM, ET) from Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif. live on the CBS Television Network, highlighted among the technological advances that will be incorporated during its coverage is the replay system EyeVision 360, Pylon Cameras, as well as the use of Next Gen Stats.

 

  In addition, CBS Sports will launch the broadcast debut of a comprehensive redesign with its new logo and on-air graphics look.

 

EYEVISION 360

 

Adding special never-before-seen features to its Super Bowl 50 coverage and with a larger complement of 5K cameras covering the area, CBS will employ a replay system giving viewers a 360° perspective and higher resolution than previously ever seen. The system, comprised of 36 cameras strung around the upper deck of Levi’s Stadium, has the ability to freeze the moment and revolve around the play, then continue to play out the scene. It allows viewers to have a look in a moment’s time from what the quarterback sees in the pocket to the safety’s perspective or other points on the field.

 

PYLON CAMERAS AND AUDIO

 

For the first time ever used in a Super Bowl, CBS is incorporating eight custom-molded pylons that house 16 cameras to film the goal lines and sidelines on each side of the field giving NFL viewers the most field-level view of critical plays during Super Bowl 50. The high-resolution, high-definition, point-of-view cameras housed inside the pylon also will have microphones embedded in them to enhance the natural sound of the game.

 

In keeping with its tradition of innovation, “EyeVision 360” and “Pylon Cam” are other examples of a long line of technical innovations CBS Sports has either developed, experimented with or was first seen throughout the years including instant replay, the Telestrator, Action-Track System, “CBS Chalkboard” for use by John Madden, real-time captioning, first-ever broadcast of a NFL game in High Definition format, as well as three dimensional replay technology called EyeVision, first time use of high frame rate camera (SwingVision), 5.1 audio and Protracer in golf.

 

LAUNCH OF NEW LOGO DESIGN AND ON-AIR GRAPHICS LOOK

 

Super Bowl 50 will mark the launch of a comprehensive redesign of CBS Sports’ iconic logo and will implement a new on-air graphics look for CBS Sports and CBS Sports Network that will debut as part of the Network’s Super Bowl Week programming and its exclusive broadcast of Super Bowl 50. The new CBS logo, which is changing for the first time in 35 years, holds true to the Network’s tradition while giving it an updated sleeker, more modern design. Visually, the renewed style of CBS Sports’ graphics package will present clean lines, bold color and strong compositions. 

 

Following the Super Bowl broadcast, the new look will be implemented across all CBS Sports and CBS Sports Network’s telecasts. CBS Sports also will create a uniform look across all CBS Sports platforms with new logos for CBS Sports Network, CBS Sports.com and CBS Sports Radio. The previous CBS Sports logo made its debut in 1981.

 

NEXT GEN STATS

 

CBS will use the NFL’s Next Gen Stats, an innovative technology platform that tracks players on-field and generates a broader set of statistical data in real-time, during its coverage of Super Bowl 50. The NFL’s Next Gen Stats allow CBS and fans to analyze and understand the action on the field in a way never possible before. Information includes: match-up based statistics between players such as separation distance between offensive and defensive players on any given play (ie. wide receiver and cornerbacks), how fast players are running, and how far they run over the course of the game on any given play. This new information will bring an exciting new dimension to the Super Bowl.  

 

Jim Nantz and Phil Simms will call SUPER BOWL 50, along with Tracy Wolfson and Evan Washburn reporting. Lance Barrow will produce and Mike Arnold will direct.

 

Sean McManus is Chairman, CBS Sports and serves as Executive Producer for the Network’s coverage of the NFL and Super Bowl 50. David Berson is President, CBS Sports. Harold Bryant is Executive Producer and Senior Vice President, Production, CBS Sports. Ken Aagaard is Executive Vice President, Engineering, Operations & Production Planning, CBS Sports. Patty Power is Senior Vice President, Operations, Engineering & Production Planning, CBS Sports. J.P. LoMonaco is Art Director, CBS Sports. Marla Keethler is Director, Graphics, CBS Sports.

 

Follow CBS Sports on Twitter: @CBSSportsGang and @NFLonCBS

 

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CBS Sports Contacts: Jen Sabatelle 212/975-4120 jsabatelle@cbs.com

Jerry Caraccioli 212/975-7466 gwcaraccioli@cbs.com

 

 

2019 Super Bowl LIII

 

January 10, 2019

 

CBS SPORTS CONTINUES LONG HISTORY OF INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR SUPER BOWL

 

CBS Sports continues its long tradition of introducing innovation and technology to the sports broadcasting industry at the Super Bowl. With first-time ever use of some of the latest, innovative technology in broadcasting, CBS Sports will give viewers unparalleled coverage of Super Bowl LIII on February 3 from Atlanta, Ga. with its use of virtual augmented reality graphics, 115 cameras including, for the first time ever on any network in the United States, multiple 8K cameras, as well as 16 cameras with 4K capabilities.

 

 VIRTUAL IS REAL

 

 For the first time ever on any network at a live sporting event, CBS’ Super Bowl LIII virtual plan includes the use of a live, wireless handheld camera showing augmented reality graphics and up-close camera tracking on the field. This will allow the camera to get closer to these virtual graphics in a way that gives viewers different perspectives and angles including never before seen field level views of these graphics.

 

CBS will utilize four cameras (including the SkyCam) with live augmented reality graphics, plus an additional 10 cameras with trackable first down line technology. In all, 14 cameras creating virtual graphic elements that are completely manufactured will seamlessly blend in to the real environment of the broadcast.  

 

 8K

 

For the first time ever on any network in the United States, CBS will use multiple 8K cameras with a unique, highly-constructed engineering solution to provide viewers with even more dramatic close-up views of the action from the endzone including possible game changing plays along the goal lines and end lines.

 

 4K BONANZA  

 

Also for the first time ever on any network, CBS will deploy 16 cameras with 4K capabilities, as well as nine Sony 4800 camera systems strategically placed around the stadium. The cameras will provide additional live game camera angles, and give the production the ability to replay key moments of the game in a super slo-motion and an HD cut-out with zoomed-in perspectives with minimal resolution loss.

 

 SCORES OF CAMERAS USED IN PYLON AND BACK OF ENDZONES CAMERAS 

 

Viewers will see dramatic plays from every angle as every square inch of the endzones will have multiple camera angles providing coverage. Over 25 cameras will flank each endzone including HD cameras with super slo-motion capabilities, six 4K cameras, three goal post super slo-motion cameras shooting the backlines and 14 cameras embedded in pylons per each side of the field. A total of 28 pylon cameras will be a part of the 50-plus camera feeds from the endzones.

 

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Following are some of the technical innovations CBS has introduced during its broadcasts of the NFL championship and Super Bowl through the years

 

January 6, 1963: The isolated camera is first used in the third annual “NFL Playoff Bowl” at the Orange Bowl between the Detroit Lions and Pittsburgh Steelers

 

January 2, 1966: CBS airs the 1965 NFL Championship Game between the Green Bay Packers and Cleveland Browns. This is the first ever NFL Championship game to be broadcast in color.

 

January 15, 1978: CBS airs Super Bowl XII between the Dallas Cowboys and Denver Broncos and introduces new technology known as Action-Track System. This new technology provides a multi-image display of paths of moving objects. For the first time, viewers are able to scrutinize the rapid, intricate motion of a forward pass.

 

January 24, 1982: CB S airs Super Bowl XVI between the San Francisco 49ers and Cincinnati Bengals and introduces for the first time the CBS Chalkboard, which allows analyst John Madden to diagram plays using a view from the high 50-yard line camera taking in all 22 players.

 

January 28, 2001: CBS broadcasts Super Bowl XXXV between the Baltimore Ravens and N.Y. Giants. CBS Sports, Core Digital and Princeton Video Image introduce EyeVision, state-of-the-art, three-dimensional replay, during the game.

 

February 1, 2004: CBS airs Super Bowl XXXVIII between the New England Patriots and Carolina Panthers. This is the first time during a Super Bowl broadcast that the pregame, game, halftime show and postgame show are in High Definition. CBS Sports utilizes unified productions for the Standard Definition and High Definition telecasts of the Super Bowl which features the same camera angles, replays, graphics and announcers.

 

February 3, 2013: CBS airs Super Bowl XLVII and deploys six “Heyeper Zoom” high frame rate, 4K replay and zoom camera systems.  “Heyeper Zoom” used For-A-Corp’s, FT-One, 4K cameras, equipped with Fujinon lenses and Evertz Corp’s DreamCatcher record servers.  The “Heyeper Zoom” replay system captured video at a frame rate between 300-500 frames per second (normal 60 fps).  The For-A cameras used 3840 by 2160 pixel imagers, totaling over 8 million pixels, four times greater than current high-definition video.  The Evertz DreamCatcher replay system recorded the 4K video signal allowing CBS Sports to use the full 4K resolution to zoom in on critical points of a play (ie. foot inbounds, turnovers, etc.) for high resolution review.

 

February 7, 2016: Adding special never-before-seen features to its Super Bowl 50 coverage and with a larger complement of 5K cameras covering the area, CBS employed a replay system giving viewers a 360° perspective and higher resolution than previously ever seen.  The system, comprised of 36 cameras strung around the upper deck of Levi’s Stadium, had the ability to freeze the moment and revolve around the play, then continues to play out the scene. It allowed viewers to have a look in a moment’s time from what the quarterback sees in the pocket to the safety’s perspective or other points on the field.

 

And, for the first time ever used in a Super Bowl, CBS incorporated eight custom-molded pylons that housed 16 cameras to film the goal lines and sidelines on each side of the field giving viewers the most field-level view of critical plays during Super Bowl 50.  The high-resolution, high-definition, point-of-view cameras housed inside the pylon also had microphones embedded in them to enhance the natural sound of the game.  

 

Sean McManus is Chairman, CBS Sports and serves as Executive Producer for the Network’s coverage of the NFL and Super Bowl LIII. David Berson is President, CBS Sports. Harold Bryant is Executive Producer and Senior Vice President, Production, CBS Sports. Patty Power is Executive Vice President, Operations and Engineering, CBS Sports. Ken Aagaard is Executive Vice President, Innovation and New Technology, CBS Sports. J.P. LoMonaco is Vice President, On-Air Graphics and Design, CBS Sports.

 

Follow CBS Sports on Twitter: @CBSSportsGang and @NFLonCBS

 

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CBS Sports Contacts: Jen Sabatelle 212/975-4120 jsabatelle@cbs.com

Jerry Caraccioli 212/975-7466 gwcaraccioli@cbs.com